O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VII [S# 120]

UNION & CONFED. CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM APRIL 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.--#9

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Richmond, Va., June 6, 1864.

Col. R. H. CHILTON,
Asst. Adjt. and Insp. General's Office, Richmond, Va.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to present the following report of my inspection of Castle Thunder Prison, Captain Richardson, commandant:

Prison buildings.--There are three buildings used as prisons, viz, Castle Thunder, with a capacity for 650 prisoners, containing at present 442; Whittock's building, used for negro quarters and prison for women, with a capacity for 350 prisoners, containing at present 109, and Palmer's factory, used for Yankee deserters, with a capacity for 400 prisoners, containing at present 160.

The prisons are clean and healthy and the sinks free from noisome smells and filth.

There is, however, one room in the wing end of the Castle the roof of which leaks, and I deem it necessary for the health of the prisoners and the protection and preservation of the building that it be repaired at once.

Prisoners.--There are 711 prisoners confined in the different buildings. They are hearty and well cared for, receiving kind treatment from both officers and employés.

Rations.--The rations tarnished the prisoners are the same furnished to the prisoners of war in the Libby and other prisons in Richmond, being one pound of corn bread, one-third of a pound of bacon, and eight quarts of peas or ten pounds of rice to the hundred rations made into a palatable and nutritious soup.

Books of record, &c.--The commandant, Captain Richardson, keeps a most excellent system of records and registry. His office books are neatly and accurately kept, and exhibit a complete and comprehensive record of each prisoner received.

Cells.--The cells are not properly ventilated and are not sufficient in number. There are four besides the condemned cell. I would respectfully recommend that four additional cells be constructed, and that the old ones be reconstructed so as to allow sufficient fresh air for the health of those confined in them.

Guards.--The guard is kept under strict discipline and a rigid compliance with the prison rules enforced. The commandant evinces a laudable desire to promote the comfort of the prisoners under his <ar120_205> charge, and permits them to cultivate a small garden within the walls of the prison, the produce of which will greatly add to their comfort and health.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. McRAE SELPH,
Assistant Adjutant and Inspector General.

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