OR, Ser. II, Vol. VI, pp. 278-280

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O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VI [S# 119]

UNION AND CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 11, 1863, TO MARCH 31, 1864.--#12

LIBBY PRISON,
Second Officers' Quarters, September 10, 1863.

Capt. J. WARNER,
Assistant Quartermaster, C. S. Military Prison:

CAPTAIN: At the request of your urbane and attentive commissary, S. Burnham, I cheerfully make the following statement: The number of prisoners occupying this floor is 254. There has been issued to us 127 pounds of beef and 235 pounds of bread, which has all been weighed in my presence, being an allowance of one-half pound of beef and one pound and two ounces of bread to each man; also rations of soap, salt, vinegar, candles, rice, and beans. These articles are of good quality, and to the best of my belief about the same quantity and quality as we have been receiving for the last two months. I will also here state that my knowledge of the feelings of my fellow-prisoners warrants me in saying that a general sentiment of satisfaction is entertained toward all the officers connected with the prison.

JAMES C. JONES,
Second Lieut., 35th Ohio Infty., Actg. Commissary, Rooms 3 and 4.

<ar119_279>

LIBBY PRISON,
First Officers' Quarters, September 10, 1863.

Capt. J. WARNER,
Assistant Quartermaster, C. S. Military Prison:

CAPTAIN: Having learned that a communication has been sent to the Secretary of War by Col. A.D. Streight, Fifty-first Indiana Volunteers, U.S. Army, complaining of the quantity of food furnished to the occupants of this floor of the Libby Prison, I wish to make the following statement in pure justice to you and your commissary, S. Burnham, whose efforts in our behalf deserve our gratitude and thanks, and also to relieve any impression on your mind that I, or the mass of my fellowprisoners, participate in the feeling of dissatisfaction and complaint evinced in the communication above alluded to, Colonel Streight being resident on this floor. For the last three days I have witnessed the weighing of 149 pounds of beef, 236 pounds of bread each day, also rations of salt, vinegar, soap, rice or beans, and candles issued to us. Our number is 299, making the ration of beef one-half pound and bread one pound and two ounces to each man. In my knowledge about the [same] quantity and quality of food has been dispensed to us for the last two months. And, in conclusion, permit me to bear testimony of the kind and courteous treatment that we have received at the hands of all the officers connected with the prison.

DAVID A. McHOLLAND,
Captain and Acting Commissary of Rooms Nos. 1 and 2.

 

[Indorsement.]

LIBBY PRISON,
Richmond, September 10, 1863.

We fully indorse the within, trusting it may correct a statement, which is false and unjust, emanating from one of the inmates of the prison; but in doing so we wish only to speak of ourselves individually without referring to the sentiments of any other officer.

CHAS. W. TILDEN,
Colonel Sixteenth Maine Volunteers.

 

JAMES M. SANDERSON,
Lieutenant-Colonel and Commissary of Subsistence, First Corps.

 

RICHMOND, September 11, 1863.

Brig. Gen. S. A. MEREDITH, Agent of Exchange:

SIR: I did hope I would be able to send you some prisoners by the boat which arrived at City Point to-day. I find it to be impossible. I will, however, at some early day send you a number corresponding to that sent by the last boat. I think I can safely promise to send them to-morrow week.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,
Agent of Exchange.

 

Page last updated on 07/08/2008