Richmond Dispatch, 7/26/1861

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From the Richmond Dispatch, 7/26/1861, p. 2

False Sympathy. - Among the Abolition prisoners captured last Sunday, is a Surgeon by the name of Connelly, son of C. M. Connelly. He is now in Howard’s factory. The father of this person is the factor in New York ____ whom most of the tobacco manufacturers in Richmond have disposed of their produce at the so-called “commercial metropolis.” He has grown rich and waxed fat on Virginia custom. It is repaid by sending his son to help cut our throats. A gentleman of the city told us yesterday that Charles M. Connelly owed the tobacco merchants now at least $250,000.

We mention these facts because we hear that a good deal of sympathy has been expressed for the person named, simply because his father was head of a “ Virginia house” in New York. Let such misguided persons remember what would have been their treatment had young Connelly and his contemporary ruffians succeeded in getting to this city otherwise thus as they did. We have heard it stated more than once, that amongst the effects captured from the Lincolnites Sunday, were more than 30,000 pairs of handcuffs. What were they for unless to inflict on us, in case of success, the last mark of degradation, - Civilized warfare does not tolerate the use of any such weapons. They are generally reserved for felons. “Think of that, Master Brook.” There are 17 Abolition doctors in prison here, and if the Confederate authorities see fit to release one or more of them to attend to their own people now here, nobody could object, least of all, our surgeons who have on their hands the care of the wounded of both sides.

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